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Walela
Unbearable Love

Label:Triloka
Release:2000
CD $14.99 - cat # (tr8063)
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"Sisters Rita and Priscilla Coolidge, along with Priscilla’s daughter Laura Satterfield, form Walela (the Cherokee word for hummingbird). Their previous CD became that rare thing, a Native American pop crossover hit, kinda like a multi-generational Cherokee Chicks, if not quite Dixie Chicks. This follow-up album stresses inspirational themes. At every turn the fearless (or flaccid) trio skirt hokum, if only on a wing and a prayer. Young Satterfield’s phrasing is from the Robbie Robertson or William Shatner school of over-emoting. “I Know I Don’t Walk On Water” comes closest to parody along the lines of comedian Al Franken’s self-affirming caricature and alter ego, Stuart Smalley. Ah, but when Rita Coolidge takes the vocal lead, with her sister Priscilla charting close harmony, and the session players kick in like Booker T. and the MG’s on a Memphis groove, Walela crosses a bridge that no Dixie Chick could ever traverse.
Mitch Ritter....Dirty Linen




Walela

Label:Triloka
Release:1997
CD $14.99 - cat # (tr8046)
To Place order, note Title and catalog #
select ORDER FORM:
or Call Toll Free: (800) 611-4698

Walela
Triloka/Mercury (1997)
Grammy award winning singer Rita Coolidge, her sister Priscilla, and Priscilla's daughter, Laura Satterfield, form the harmony act Walela. Although this is their debut CD, the women are accomplished musicians: Rita is an internationally known vocalist whose career spans two decades, Priscilla is a composer whose songs have been recorded by Emmylou Harris and Willie Nelson, and Laura is a studio musician whose talents are in demand. The music on Walela celebrates the trio's Cherokee heritage ("walela" is the Cherokee word for hummingbird). Elements of their Southern and gospel roots find their way into the songs too, as in a version of "Amazing Grace" sung in the Cherokee language. Rhythm and instrumentation include pop and Native American features, with flutes and percussion providing counterpoint to the women's voices. Original lyrics in songs such as "Muddy Road" and "The Warrior" form the core of the project, and they are insightful and bring to light an aspect of Native American heritage -- the tribes of the south -- that hasn't been explored often in recorded music. It's not a museum piece by any means, though, but rather a graceful, original, and musical project that will appeal as much to those who enjoy Native American music as to those who like thoughtful, intriguing songs in the singer/songwriter genre.
-- Kerry Dexter (Tallahassee, FL)




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