McGrew's MiscellaneaCamporal

Events for a Camporal

Small teams of youth compete against each other in an assortment of events that test their teamwork and outdoor skills. At the end of the day, awards are presented based on each team's overall performance.

This document describes competitive team events that work well as part of a Camporal. It may be useful also to anyone looking for challenging team activities. Information about scoring systems for a Camporal are in another document.

When selecting events for your Camporal, try to include a good variety of different types of events. A variety of events will require teams to be well-rounded if they are to do well in the overall competition. Also, a variety of events will improve the chances that any given team will excel in at least one event.

I think it's a good idea to vary the events somewhat from year to year. One way to do this is to choose a different theme each year, adapting standard events to fit the theme and introducing new theme-specific events.

Identification Events

These are simple tests of basic knowledge. A single Camporal can include multiple identification events, provided they address sufficiently different categories of knowledge. Categories of knowledge that work well with identification events include basic knots, map symbols, local plants/animals, and scripture verses. (Actually, scripture verses are usually recited from memory, rather than identified as such, but the basic concept is similar.)

To enable teams to prepare for identification events, the event instructions should include either a list a items to be identified, or a reference to a readily available list of items (e.g., a list that appears in your organization's handbook).

Cooperative Identification

Present a set of items to each team as a group. Within a specified time limit (e.g., 10 minutes), each team must present to the judge a list with the names of the items.

Scoring

Teams receive a specified number of points for each item correctly identified.

Independent Identification

Present a set of items to the members of each team individually. Every team member must identify every item independently. (This is a useful approach with memorized scripture verses.)

Scoring

Teams receive a specified number of points for each item correctly identified by every team member.

Identification Relay

Mark a starting line. Approximately 20 feet from the starting line, place a chart or other display with items to be identified. Write the names of the items on an equal number of cards.

Team members line up behind the starting line in any order. Only one member can be past the starting line at any time. One at a time, in the selected order, each member approaches the chart or display, receives a card from the judge, and places the card next to the corresponding item. If another card is already next to that item, the incorrectly placed card should be returned to the judge (who will place it at the bottom of the face-down stack of cards). Time stops when all items are correctly identified and all team members are behind the starting line.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Memory Test

Present 25 items arranged in a five-by-five grid. Allow each team one minute to observe the items. Then give them a sheet of paper with a similar five-by-five grid drawn on it, and allow them three minutes to write down the items' names and locations.

Variation

Leave one or more spots in the grid empty.

Scoring

Teams receive a specified number of points for each item correctly identified in its correct location. Partial credit can be given for partial identification (e.g., "a leaf" rather than "an oak leaf"), or for items correctly identified but listed in an incorrect location.

Fire Building

The following events involve building fires. Proper fire-safety procedures should be followed. Proper knife- and axe-safety procedures should be followed while preparing the fire-building materials. It is a good idea to specify in the the event instructions which tools (e.g., hatchets, knives) and supplies (e.g., fuel, matches) will be provided by the event organizers, and which must be provided by the team itself.

String Burn

Each team prepares a fire lay using specified materials (e.g., two matches, one cotton ball, a one-foot section of 2x4). Any type of fire lay may be used, but no additional materials may be used. The objective is to burn through a horizontal string 10 inches above the ground. Additional matches (but not additional tinder, kindling, or fuel) can be used, but will add a penalty to the team's overall time.

Variations

Two strings are used, one 10 inches above the ground and the other 15 inches above the ground. The objective is to burn through the upper string. Any quantity of approved fire-building materials may be used, provided that the fire lay remains below the lower string, and that no further actions are taken by any team members once the lower string burns through.

Secure one end of the string that will be be burned, and use the other end to suspend an object. When the string burns through, the object will fall. Good objects to suspend this way include bells (which ring) and water balloons (which douse the fire).

Scoring

This can be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event. It can also be scored based on progressive goals (e.g., fire lay built, fire lit, each string burned through).

Pancake Cook-Off

Each team must build a fire, mix pancake batter, and cook a pancake at least 4 inches in diameter. The intact pancake must completely cover a circle that is 4 inches in diameter. Then a single team member must eat the pancake and whistle to demonstrate that the pancake has been eaten. (Note that thinner pancakes are easier to eat, but harder to keep intact.)

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Water Boiling

Provide each team with two matches and a metal container (e.g., a one-gallon bucket or an empty #10 can). Pour a standard amount of water into the container. The objective is to build a fire to boil the water. The teams build a fire lay using any quantity of approved fire-building materials. Additional matches can be used, but will add a penalty to the team's overall time.

Variations

Rather than have the judge determine when the water is boiling, add a small amount of liquid dish soap to the water. The goal is to boil the water until the resulting suds overflow (partially quenching the fire). The container must be kept upright.

Rather than have the judge determine when the water is boiling, provide each team with six strands of spaghetti. The objective is to produce two strands of spaghetti tied together with a square (reef) knot. Thinner pasta (e.g., vermicelli, capellini) cooks faster; make sure everyone is using the same kind.

Provide a large amount of water in the container initially, but allow participants to pour some of it out as long as they can still meet the stated goal (measuring 1 cup of boiling water, overflowing the container with suds, or boiling spaghetti). This rewards teams that figure out (or hear in advance) the trick that less water takes less time to come to a boil.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Matchless Fire Starting

Each team must build a self-sustaining flame in kindling using the technique of their choice. Each team must supply their own fire-building materials, which can be prepared in advance. Matches, cigarette lighters, commercial scratch lighters, lighter fluid, and the like are prohibited.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Wet Wood Fire Starting

Soak a supply of small logs overnight in a barrel full of water. Provide each team with two or three of these logs and two dry matches. Each team must build a self-sustaining flame using only these materials. Additional matches can be used, but will add a penalty to the team's overall time.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Pioneering

In addition to these events, which involve the application of knots and lashings, you should also consider knot identification events.

Knot-Tying Relay

It is a good idea to publish the official knots to be used for this event as part of the event instructions. Good basic knots for knot-tying relays include

Each official knot is listed on a separate wooden stick, and the sticks are placed in a cup. In turn, each team member comes forward, draws one stick from the cup, and ties the knot listed. If the knot is tied correctly, the stick is withdrawn from the cup. If the knot is not tied correctly, the stick is returned to the cup and the next team member may take a turn. The objective is to remove all the sticks from the cup.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Blindfolded Knot Tying

Team members are blindfolded, and must correctly tie the knots the judge tells them to tie.

Scoring

Teams receive a specified number of points for each knot correctly tied.

Long-Distance Knot Tying

Mark a circle around a tree or post with at least a 4-foot radius. Provide each team with a length of rope at least twice as long as the diameter of the circle. The objective is for each team to tie a specified knot around the tree or post without stepping into the circle. A penalty (e.g., 15 seconds) will be added to the team's overall time each time any team member steps into the circle. The clove hitch is a good (perhaps even traditional) knot for this event, but a round turn and two half hitches works well too.

Variations

One team member must hold each end of the rope, and cannot let go until the knot is completed. A penalty (e.g., 15 seconds) will be added to the team's overall time each time either one lets go of the end of the rope.

You can also blindfold the two team members who are holding the ends of the rope.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Tripod Construction

Each team builds a tripod and suspends one team member off the ground using the tripod. Time stops when the tripod is stable, one team member is suspended above the ground, and no other team member is touching the tripod.

Variations

A penalty (e.g., 15 seconds) could be added to the team's overall time for each incorrectly tied lashing or hitch.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Flag Pole Raising

Provide each team with three poles of equal length, three stakes, and enough rope for the lashings and guy lines. The objective is to raise a self-supporting flag pole. The three poles are lashed together, forming a flag pole that is at least twice as tall as a single pole. Each pole should be joined to the next with a pair of shear lashings (a single lashing is unstable—two are required for rigidity).

The pole is supported by three guy lines attached to stakes driven into the ground by team members. The guy lines should be attached to the flag pole with clove hitches, and secured to the stakes with tautline hitches.

Variations

For an additional challenge, require that a flag (either the team's banner, or a flag provided by the judge) be hoisted to the top of the flag pole after the flag pole has been secured by the guy lines. This requires a long rope to carry the flag, and a short rope at the top of the flag pole to serve as a "pulley".

If each team has a flag, then the team flag should be lashed to the top pole before the pole is raised.

You could add a penalty (e.g., 15 seconds) to the team's overall time for each incorrectly tied lashing or hitch.

You could require that the teams raise the pole without touching it, by holding onto only the guy lines.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Chariot Race

Mark a starting line and a turn-around point some distance from the starting line. Provide each team with two 8-foot poles, one 4-foot pole, and three 8-foot ropes.

Each team will construct a large "A" with the poles, lashing the angles. One team member rides the "chariot" while the others drag it across the starting line, around the turn-around point, and back across the starting line. Both lower legs of the chariot must remain on the ground. If the poles come untied, or the rider falls off, the team must stop and correct the problem before continuing. The poles must be unlashed and any knots untied before the time stops.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Log Hoist

There must be a horizontal beam or tree branch at the event site. It should be about 10 feet high. Provide a log, a stake driven into the ground, and a rope at least 30 feet long. The objective is to secure the rope to the log with a timber hitch, throw the rope over the horizontal beam or tree branch, hoist the log off the ground, and secure the rope to the stake.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Log Pull Relay

Mark a starting line and a turn-around point some distance from the starting line. Provide each team with two 10-foot ropes and a log. In turn, each team member must secure a rope to the log; drag the log across the starting line, around the turn-around point, and back across the starting line; and untie the rope from the log. The next team member secures the other rope to the log, and repeats the process.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Rope Making

Provide materials for the teams to make their own ropes. This works best as an early event, with later events using these ropes.

Scoring

This event should be timed, but unscored. The quality of each team's rope will affect its score in later events.

Orienteering

These are not long, difficult orienteering courses, but simple tests of basic map and compass skills. Use magnetic bearings on compass courses to make the compass work easier.

Get someone who understands vector arithmetic (or at least trigonometry) to prepare the compass courses in advance. For each compass course, the judges should be able to verify the ending point with a single bearing and distance from the starting point. If I ever create suitable compass courses, I'll add them to this web site.

Linear Compass Course

Mark a north–south or east–west line 100 feet long. Place numbered markers along the length of this line. Prepare compass courses that begin at one marker and end at another marker. Each course should cover roughly the same total distance. Each member of a standard-sized team should get a turn at the compass, but it might be better for each team to complete two three-leg courses than a single six-leg course.

Allow all team members to measure their pace length using the measured 100-foot distance. In turn, each team member takes a bearing, paces the corresponding distance, and hands the compass to the next team member. Other team members can assist in any way desired, but the team member with the compass must take the bearing and pace the distance himself. Each team reports the end point(s) of its course(s) to the judge.

Variation

Each team member completes a separate three-leg course.

Scoring

Teams start with the maximum event score, and lose points based on how far off they were from the correct end point.

Circular Compass Course

Mark a circle, placing between 8 and 24 markers around the perimeter of the circle. The markers do not need to be spaced evenly, although it's easier to set up the course if they are. Prepare compass courses that move from one marker to another. Each member of a standard-sized team should get a turn at the compass. The courses don't need distances, just a starting location and a series of bearings. All the courses should be of similar difficulty. (Bearings across the circle are much easier to take correctly than bearings near the circumference of the circle.)

In turn, each team member takes a bearing, identifies the next marker, and hands the compass to the next team member. Other team members can assist in any way desired, but the team member with the compass must take the bearing and identify the next marker himself. The resulting marker sequence (the starting location, plus the end point of each leg) is reported to the judge. Note that early mistakes will cause the rest of the sequence to be wrong.

Variation

Each team member completes a separate three-leg course.

Scoring

Teams receive a specified number of points for each marker correctly identified.

Compass Bearing Relay

Mark a circle, placing a marker in the center of the circle and between 8 and 24 markers around the perimeter of the circle. (The markers do not need to be spaced evenly, although it's easier to set up the course if they are.)

Taking turns using a single compass, each team member goes to the center of the circle, receives a bearing, and then identifies and records the marker located at that bearing. Each team takes the same number of bearings.

Variation

Establish a time limit (no more than one minute for every eight markers used). The team must take as many correct bearings as possible within the specified time limit.

Scoring

Teams receive a specified number of points for each marker correctly identified. This can also be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event, and adding a penalty (e.g., 15 seconds) to the team's overall time for each incorrectly identified marker.

Map-Reading Scavenger Hunt

Mark a number of target locations on a topographic map of large area (up to 10 acres per target location). If possible, prepare several different maps with different target locations, so that different teams receive different maps. Set a time limit between 2 and 5 minutes per target location. Provide one copy of the topographic map to each team.

The objective is to locate and positively identify as many target locations as possible during the time alotted. One method for verifying which target locations a team has found is to require them to answer questions about unique features at each location. A better method is to place a small rubber stamp at each location, and to have the teams stamp the back of their maps with each stamp as it is found. (This latter method also has the advantage of forcing the team to stay together, rather than splitting up.)

Scoring

Each target location is worth a certain number of points. Targets closer to the home base are worth less than those that are further away. Impose a significant penalty for each minute by which a late team misses the alotted time.

Obstacle Courses and Other Races

A single Camporal can include multiple obstacle course and race events, provided the different obstacle courses are completed under sufficiently different circumstances. Mark the course clearly, so that no one takes a wrong turn. Obstacles might include

While most of these events should be timed with each team competing separately, a race where all teams compete simultaneously can be a great way to close the day's competition. If you have too many teams for this, two or three timed heats can work just as well.

Bucket Brigade Obstacle Course

Mark an obstacle course. A short, challenging course is better than a long, level course. You'll need an ample water supply at the starting line. Place an empty container (five-gallon buckets work well) at the finish line and provide each team with two "buckets" (plastic one-gallon bottles work well if you remove their bottoms and screw their lids on). The objective is to fill the empty container to a specified level as quickly as possible by carrying water around the obstacle course in the buckets.

Variations

Poke holes in the "buckets" bottles for an extra challenge.

Establish a time limit (e.g., 10 minutes). The team must transport as much water as possible within the specified time limit.

Only the buckets need to follow the obstacle course (e.g., passing buckets through a narrow opening is better than trying to sqeeze through yourself).

Scoring

This can be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event. If a time limit is used, either award a certain number of points for each quart (liter) of water transported, or rank the teams by the amount of water transported and use a scoring system similar to those appropriate for timed events.

Bucket Brigade Obstacle Relay

Start with a full container of water (plastic cups work well). In turn, each team member carries the container through the obstacle course. This event is untimed, although it is probably a good idea to impose a resonable time limit.

Scoring

Either award a certain number of points for each ounce of water transported, or rank the teams by the amount of water transported and use a scoring system similar to those appropriate for timed events.

Hands-Off Object Transportation

The teams must transport an object (or several similar/dissimilar objects) without touching them. If any team member touches the object, it is returned to the starting line. Various tools are provided for the teams to use in any way they see fit. Here are some examples of object–tool combinations:

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Hazmat Transportation

This is an elaborate variation of the previous "Hands-Off Object Transportation" event.

Mark two circles on the ground (10-foot radius). Mark a starting line on the ground. Place a container that is about a quarter full of water in the center of one circle. Make a pickup device that consists of an elastic band with as many 15-foot ropes tied to it as a standard-sized team has members. If the container is a 5-gallon bucket, a bicycle inner tube doubled over works well as an elastic band. If the container is a 3-pound coffee can, a 3-inch band cut from an old truck inner tube works well. Tie an overhand knot in each rope 10 feet from the elastic band.

The objective is to transport the container (the "hazardous materials", or "hazmat") from one circle to another, without any member of the team coming within ten feet of the container. A penalty (e.g., 30 seconds) should be added to the team's overall time if any of the container's contents are spilled. The technique is as follows:

  1. Stretch the elastic band by pulling on the ropes.
  2. Lower the elastic band over the container.
  3. Relax the tension on the ropes, allowing the elastic band to grip the container.
  4. Lift the container by the ropes, and carry it to the other circle.
  5. Pull on the ropes to stretch the elastic band and release the container.

If any team member comes within ten feet of the container (i.e., enters the circle while picking up or dropping off the container, or touches a rope inside the knot while transporting the container), that member must drop out of the event and the team must continue without him/her. A penalty (e.g., 15 seconds) can be added to the team's overall time for each member so disqualified, but I think completing the event shorthanded is enough of a penalty.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Passive Obstacle Course

One team member (usually the smallest) must complete the course, but is not allowed to stand, walk, crawl, or otherwise transport himself/herself. The remaining team members must lift and carry the designated team member through, over, around, etc., the course's obstacles.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Cross-Country Skiing

The objective is to move through the obstacle course while standing on "skis" made from two 8-foot 2x6 boards. The boards have ropes attached along their length (drill holes through the center of the board, thread the ropes through, and knot the ends) to use as handles. Team members stand on the skis, hold the ropes, and walk together without anyone stepping off.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Bridge Relay

Mark two banks of a "river" approximately 25 feet apart. (Do not use a real river!) Each team must provide two boards, each at least 4 feet long, but of any width desired by the team members.

The objective is for one member of each team (the "bridge walker") to cross the river without "falling in" (without touching the ground). Four other team members will hold the boards (one at each end of each board) and move the boards to keep up with the bridge walker. While the bridge walker is standing on a board, the team members holding that board must remain stationary. If the bridge walker touches the ground, the team must start over.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

River Crossing Relay

Mark two banks of a "river" approximately 25 feet apart. (Do not use a real river!) Place sandbags ("rocks") at various points across the river. Provide each team with two boards. Make sure the sandbags are too far apart to allow the teams to simply jump from one to another, but no further apart than the length of the boards.

The objective is for every member of the team to cross the river without "falling in" (without touching the ground). The team may use the boards to bridge the distance between rocks, moving the boards as they progress across the river. A penalty (e.g., 15 seconds) will be added to the team's overall time each time any team member touches the ground.

Variation

Give the team equipment (e.g., weighted backpacks) to transport.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Electric Fence Crossing

Tie a rope around four trees/poles to make an area at least 15 feet square. The rope should be several inches above the waist of the tallest team members; adjust the height appropriately for especially tall/short teams. Place an 8-foot 2x6 board inside the fenced area, as well as any other objects (e.g., ropes, plastic bags, staves, buckets) you want to provide. The team starts inside the fenced area. The objective is for every member of the team to cross over the rope to the outside without touching the rope.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Paddleless Canoe Race

Each team paddles a canoe around the course. All team members must be inside the canoe. Personal flotation devices ("life jackets") must be worn. No paddles may be used; team members must propel the canoe with their hands.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Monster Relay

Mark a starting line on the ground. Several yards away, mark a finish line. The objective is for the entire team to complete the course together. The challenge is that, for a standard team of n members, only (n/2) legs/feet and (n/2) hands/arms may touch the ground.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Miscellaneous Events

Some of these events use subjective judging criteria, and I have not provided very good criteria for the judges to use. I hope to provide better guidelines for judges in the future. If you have suggestions, please send me e-mail.

Hit the Target

The goal is simply to hit the target. There are any number of variations on this event, using different objects, targets, and means of hitting the target with the object. In most cases, each team member should be allowed to make one or two individual attempts, although sometimes the entire team will need to work together. Here are some examples.

Variation

Provide each team with three 6-foot poles and three ropes. Team members must lash the poles together into a long "fishing pole", then tie the remaining rope to the end of the pole and tie a large stop knot in the free end of the "fishing line". The goal is to drop the knot into a hole (or basket, bucket, etc.) 15 feet away. Inside the hole are "fish" (rat traps that will close on the rope). The team must retrieve one "fish" for each of its members.

Scoring

If the number of attempts is limited, then teams should receive a specified number of points for each successful attempt. Otherwise, teams should be timed until they succeed (or until they succeed the specified number of times), using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Log Cutting

This is a timed event. Each team will use a two-man bucksaw to cut a slab from a log or pole (do not use treated wood; the necessary precautions would interfere with the enjoyment of the event). Team members can take turns at the saw, but are not required to do so.

Variation

A penalty (e.g., 30 seconds) can be added to the team's overall time if the slab is thicker than 3¼ inches at any point, or thinner than 2¾ inches at any point.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Ring the Bell

Suspend a bell about 10 to 12 feet above the ground. The objective is for one team member to ring the bell with his/her hand. No equipment is allowed.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Crowded Platform

Place a small platform on the ground. The area of the platform should be approximately one square foot for every 2 to 4 members of a standard-sized team. The objective is to get all team members on the platform without anyone touching the ground or falling off. No equipment is allowed. Time stops after the entire team has remained on the platform for 10 seconds.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

Estimating Heights

Estimate the height of a pole. No form of direct measurement (e.g., running a line up the pole) is allowed.

Variations

Estimate the height of a hill. Team members are allowed to climb the hill. Any measuring technique is allowed.

Estimate the width of a "river" without crossing it. The near "bank of the river" should be a line marked on the ground. The far "bank of the river" can be a parallel line or possibly a pole or other object, but it should be between 50 and 150 feet away. Any measuring technique is allowed.

Scoring

Teams start with the maximum event score, and lose points based on how far off they were from the measured height.

Tent Pitching

Team members pitch a tent. Each team can provide its own tent (specify the minimum size), or a standard tent can be provided to and pitched by all teams. Another option would be to provide rope, a tarp, and poles and have the teams erect a simple shelter using these materials.

Variation

Blindfold all team members. If you want you can say they're in a blinding blizzard, dust storm, etc. and must erect a shelter.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event.

First Aid

First-aid events can be as simple as evacuating a "patient" (e.g., a mannequin, a volunteer, the judge, a team member). They can also be more complex, involving realistic make-up to simulate various injuries (broken bones, frostbite, cuts, sprains, etc.) that must be diagnosed and treated by the team. Teams can also be required to evacuate their patients after treating them.

Scoring

Simple evacuation events can be timed, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event. Any first-aid event can be scored, using a checklist for the judge to record whether proper actions were taken (including calling/sending for help), whether the team had sufficient first-aid supplies, etc.

Pass the Hoop

Have the team members form a circle, holding hands. Have two members release their grip, then place a large hoop between them and have them take hands again, this time reaching through the hoop. The objective is to pass the hoop over each team member until it reaches its starting location, without anyone letting go of their neighbors' hands.

Variation

Add a second hoop, and pass it around the circle in the opposite direction.

Scoring

This should be a timed event, using any scoring system appropriate for a timed event. If any pair of members releases their grip, you can either assess a penalty (e.g., 15 seconds) to their overall time, or you can make them start over and pass the hoop until it reaches the wherever it was when the circle was broken.

Uniforms

Organizations that have official uniforms can award points for team members wearing proper uniforms during opening/closing formations.

Scoring

During each formation, each team receives a specified number of points for each member present in proper uniform. Teams with extra members should not receive extra points.

Formation

Any organization can award points for proper behavior (e.g., Parade Rest, no talking) during opening/closing formations.

Scoring

During each formation, each team receives a specified number of points for each member exhibiting proper behavior. Teams with extra members should not receive extra points.

Team Banners

Teams may bring banners for use during opening/closing formations. Banners can be used also for campsite identification (leaving them in the team's campsite during the competition), or for team identification (carrying them from one event to the next during the competition). It is a good idea to set a maximum size for team banners (e.g., 3 feet by 5 feet).

Scoring

Banners should be judged on design, workmanship, and creativity. All banners should earn points.

Meal Preparation

Each team prepares Saturday lunch and Saturday dinner for itself plus two staff members.

Scoring

The two staff members will rate the team's cooking, and possibly their hospitality.

Campsite Inspection

Each campsite is inspected during the day while the teams are competing. It is a good idea to publish the inspection checklist as part of the event instructions.

Scoring

Points are awarded based on objective criteria listed on the inspection checklist.

Initiative Test

This is any event that is not described in the pre-event literature. The event is explained to each team just before it competes in the event. Teams which have not yet competed this event are not allowed to observe other teams competing in this event. The event should test the team's ability to work together in unfamiliar situations; events that require creativity and teamwork are better for this purpose than events that primarily test specific skills.

If an earlier event required teams to provide their own materials, the initiative test could require them to repeat that event. The team could also be required to complete a different task that required the same materials as a previous event. This approach is especially effective when teams are supposed to carry all their supplies from event to event.

Character Test

Some organizers have staged situations where a team could easily offer assistance to someone who appears to be in need. Teams that stop and offer assistance receive points, and those that continue on their way don't.

These events work if they are truly unanticipated by the participants. Repeated use of this kind of event can become well known among teams that attend the event several years in a row. The staged situation must be realistic, and must be a situation where it would be appropriate for the team members to offer assistance. It should be located somewhere where there isn't a lot of traffic (i.e., where the person "in need of help" has few other immediate options), and must be located along a route that every team is guaranteed to take at some point during the day.

Since an "Initiative Test" event must be located away from the other events (to avoid observation by teams that haven't competed yet), it might work well to use this event as the "Initiative Test" every few years. Simply locate the staged situation along the route to the published location of the "Initiative Test" event.